Ibiza’s seemingly never ending stream of ordinances aiming to curtail what some see as the excesses of its party island culture, have received considerable attention and comment locally, nationally and internationally.

These have included Ibiza Town’s controls on public decency being maintained in advertising and promotion, and what many feel are San Antonio’s misinterpreted but poorly presented regulations on drinking and other activities in public places.

But it seems that exasperation with the tacky end of a break-in-the-sun is not restricted to our own island, as Mojácar, a major tourist resort in Almería, has passed new regulations designed to end what it considers the “vulgarity” often associated with stag and hen parties.

Ban the Boob & Stop the Cock, It's Not Only in Ibiza
Ban the Boob & Stop the Cock, It's Not Only in Ibiza

Henceforth, the Mediterranean town will no longer tolerate what El Pais today referred to as “the public exhibition of phallic tiaras or unbecoming behaviour with inflatable sex dolls.”

a british hen party in spain, proper classy
a british hen party in spain, proper classy

The initiative does not carry unanimous support however and an opposition Socialist spokesman called the initiative “a factory for destroying future tourists” – mmm, where have we heard that before?

To follow as reported in El Pais and translated by Susanna Urra.

The city council has just approved an ordinance addressing behaviour in public spaces and is also banning the practice of walking around the streets in bathing trunks with no shirt, a practice popular with many tourists. Outright nudity is also specifically prohibited.

But it’s the stag and hen parties that have drawn the most ire from local officials.

“We’re sick and tired of seeing inflatable dolls and phallic tiaras. We don’t want that kind of obscene behaviour in our town,” said Mayor Rosa María Cano, of the conservative Popular Party (PP).

Bachelor parties themselves are not being banned, she noted, adding: “That would be undemocratic.”

Instead, Cano said the aim of the new rules is to make these celebrations compatible with family tourism, since bachelor parties “begin at noon in places where there are children present.”

Anybody breaching the regulations will be subject to fines of between €100 and €300, although if the rules are broken in crowded areas where there are children or in buildings under landmark protection, the fine could be as steep as €1,000.

The ordinance was rejected by all three opposition groups in the council. Manuel Zamora, a Socialist (PSOE) spokesman, called the local council “a factory for destroying tourism.”

“Anybody fined for wearing a bathing suit on the street would find it so ridiculous and unfair they would never return here,” said Zamora. “And then they will tell everyone about it and the news will spread like wildfire, and people considering coming to Mojácar will go somewhere else.”